Teaching


MAYSESSION 2018
LING 5050: Technical tools for linguists (graduate and undergraduate)

SPRING 2018
LING 7890.04: Pragmatics discussion group (graduate)

AUTUMN 2017
LING 7890.04: Pragmatics discussion group (graduate)

LING 5801: Introduction to Computational linguistics (graduate)

SPRING 2017
LING 7890.04: Pragmatics discussion group (graduate)

LING 5804: Analyzing language in social media (co-taught with Lauren Squires)

This course will approach the study of language and interaction in social media from both theoretical and practical angles. From the theoretical side, we will explore why social media are of interest for linguistic and other social science researchers, focusing on previous research findings about communicative behavior in social media. From the practical side, we will teach students to perform analysis of social media behavior, covering all steps in the research process from data collection/selection to quantitative and qualitative analysis and reporting. Students in the course will learn to think more critically about these daily media practices and their role in society, and they will also gain hands-on skills they can take to their future endeavors. No previous experience in linguistics or programming is required, though some background in the study of language will be helpful.

AUTUMN 2016
LING 7890.04: Pragmatics discussion group (graduate)

LING 4400: Linguistic meaning

MAYSESSION 2016
LING 5050: Technical tools for linguists (graduate and undergraduate)

SPRING 2016
LING 4400: Linguistic meaning

AUTUMN 2015
LING 5801: Introduction to Computational linguistics (graduate)

MAYSESSION 2015
LING 5050: Technical tools for linguists (graduate and undergraduate)

SPRING 2015
LING 7890.08: Clippers -- Computational linguistics discussion group (graduate)

LING 4400: Linguistic meaning

LING 8450: Seminar in computational and experimental pragmatics (graduate)

The course explores recent research in the fields of computational and experimental pragmatics, looking at topics such as models of reference, projective meaning, sentiment analysis, and scalar implicature. We will investigate how efforts in theoretical linguistics and computational/experimental techniques can complement each other. The course will cover both basic tutorial material and more advanced topics. Students are encouraged to pursue a term project related to their own developing research interests. At the end of the course, students will be able to conduct research in experimental pragmatics, will be familiar with the advantages and drawbacks of crowdsourcing methods, and will understand the current mainstream efforts in computational pragmatics.

AUTUMN 2014
LING 7890.08: Clippers -- Computational linguistics discussion group (graduate)

MAYSESSION 2014
LING 5050: Technical tools for linguists (graduate and undergraduate)

SPRING 2014
LING 7890.08: Clippers -- Computational linguistics discussion group (graduate)

AUTUMN 2013
LING 4400: Linguistic meaning

LING 7890.08: Clippers -- Computational linguistics discussion group (graduate)

MAYSESSION 2013
LING 8800: Seminar in computational linguistics (graduate)
Topic: Computational methods for linguists

The course introduces computational methods for collecting and analyzing quantitative linguistic data, with a primary focus on the use of corpora in exploring theoretical questions in various areas of linguistics. Topics include the access and retrieval of corpus data (i.a., tgrep/Tregex), automatic methods of data annotation, and statistical modeling. The class will be hands-on: you will get practical experience with various computational tools, as well as with the statistical package R.

SPRING 2013
LING 3802: Language and Computers